VE Day

As tomorrow marks the 75th Anniversary for VE DAY, we thought it would be nice to share some personal stories of the heroes in our families. It’s so important to remember our war heroes and the sacrifices they made. 

1 – Clifford Clive Murray
“My grandfather joined the Navy as a boy seaman at the age of 16 in 1940. He was part of WWII in the Royal Navy and was on active duty at sea in warships. His ship was torpedoed, and they were rescued from the sea. He would only have been 20 years old at the end of that war. He was then stationed in various parts of Britain where he eventually met my Grand Mother in Portsmouth. She was a WREN. They returned to South Africa in 1954 with my mother at age 2 and lived on Robin Island. He continued in the South African Navy as a Chief Warrant Officer.”

1 – CLIFFORD MURRAY

2 – John Thorburn
“In 1942 John joined the Air Training Corps and passed all the exams necessary to qualify for a shortened flying training course. He found himself rather frustrated on deferred RAF service, doing fire watch in Bath and spotting enemy aircraft. The delay in starting his pilot training very likely saved his life. He was eventually part of a group of 50 young men similarly qualified so found himself on a troopship to South Africa and began flying training on Tiger Moths and Harvard’s. John was selected to fly fighters and posted to 631 Squadron to fly his dream machine the Spitfire. On VE Day John was in Durban before being transferred to 80 Squadron to fly the mighty Tempest fighter.

2 – JOHN THORBURN

3 – Peter Kay
“My Grandad joined the Royal Navy towards the end of the war. He was deployed to Bombay (Mumbai) to protect the waters surrounding western India. His ship sailed into Singapore just after the peace treaty was signed. He always used to say that seeing that part of the world was very exotic for a young Yorkshireman!”

3 – PETER KAY

4 – Bob Duncan
“My grandad sent regular photos and messages to my Gran whilst he was in Normandy serving with the Royal Artillery. They got married while he was on leave but was 3 days late due to fog in 1945.”

4 – BOB DUNCAN